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10 Tips for Better Sleep

For most adrenal fatigue sufferers, sleep is a common and consistent problem. It’s one of the biggest reasons for the total exhaustion and symptoms that accompanies this obscure and difficult to treat syndrome.  Your adrenal glands are like a motor for the body. When your hormone stores in these glands are depleted, your body as a vehicle can’t run.

Sleep is necessary for life. Without adequate, restorative sleep, your body will start shutting down. Something physiologically magical happens when you’re asleep (assuming you have a regular sleeping pattern) – all the glands and “working components” of your body are restored and replenished.

Unfortunately, we’ve taught ourselves as a culture a lack of sleep is good and burning the midnight oil is something that should be rewarded. We tend to see those who get enough sleep as being “lazy” or “unambitious.” But here’s the thing: people who get good sleep are healthier, more productive, and less stressed.

While sleep is sometimes elusive, especially when you’ve got a lot going on like high stress levels or a psychological condition like PTSD, it’s not impossible to reach a level of normalcy.  You can train your brain to “shut down” for sleep.  You do that by finding different hygienic practices that will help you develop a pattern and routine for sleep.

My Top 10 Tips for Better Sleep 

  1. First and foremost, be gentle with yourself. Sleep doesn’t always come naturally, especially if you’ve been struggling with it for years. Be kind and forgiving.
  2. Sleep thrives with routine. Create a sleep regimen and do it every night.  Here are a few examples of what I mean:
  3. Go to sleep and wake up at the same time every day, yes, even on the weekends.
  4. Take a hot shower or bath 30 minutes before bed every night.
  5. Meditate for 15 minutes before bed each night.
  6. Stop eating at night, especially carbs. Avoid food two to three hours before you go to bed. The body will keep the mind awake to digest the food.
  7. Exercise in the morning or at lunch. This will give your body time to come down and relax after raising that heart rate.
  8. Limit liquid intake an hour or two before bed. Water is immensely helpful when you drink a lot of it throughout the day; however, it can keep you up all night with toe-stubbing bathroom trips in the dark if you are not careful.
  9. Shut down electronics 45 minutes to an hour before bedtime. Whatever is on the screen can wait. The lights on the screens activate certain parts of the brain and make you more wakeful. It’s hard to bring the brain down to rest after looking at a screen.
  10. Create some stress coping techniques. Stress is one of the biggest causes of adrenal fatigue. Limiting stress is about your well-being – it’s not about the person or thing causing the stress.
  11. Try taking supplements like 5-HTP, GABA, and melatonin (sparingly).  GABA is especially good for stress management and sleep.
  12. Caffeine is always a tough subject. You’re exhausted, so you may feel like you need caffeine, but the truth is, it’s probably doing you more harm than good. Switch to decaf.
  13. Stay away from sleeping pills. They have serious side effects can lead to dependence. There are better ways to find sleep relief.

There are so many ways you can improve sleep. I urge you to pay close attention to the number 1 tip above: be kind to yourself. More to the point, believe in yourself. You can get better, and you will feel better if you do the work. There is a lot of it, but it’s rewarding work that’ll benefit you.  Even if none of these tips work quite right, there are still more ways you can reduce adrenal fatigue symptoms.  You never have to do any of this alone. I’m just a phone call or e-mail message away.  Get in touch, and let’s find out what you need.

Sources:

Natural Healing Ways – Sleeping Well with Adrenal Fatigue

Progress Your Health – Improving Sleep with Adrenal Fatigue

Your Fibro Doctor – Fibromyalgia, Your Sleep, and Adrenal Fatigue

How to Know if You’re Deficient in Vitamins and Hormones

How to Know if You’re Deficient in Vitamins and Hormones

There are many reasons imbalances occur within the body, and each body reacts differently to these disparities. The better you understand your system, the more prepared you’ll be to face some of the most common side effects, like migraine, head-on (pun totally intended).

It’s human nature to assume if we eat a healthy diet, we’re getting all the nutrients, vitamins, and minerals we need; however, this isn’t always the case. Many people suffer from vitamin and hormone deficiencies without even knowing it.

Today, I’m going to look at a few telltale signs of these deficiencies.  Let’s see if it helps you narrow down some of your issues.  First, let’s review the role and importance of the essentials.

Why Are Hormones and Vitamins Important?

Vitamins and minerals play an instrumental role in how we heal, turn food into energy, keep illnesses at bay, and repair any cellular damage.

Hormones, on the other hand, help regulate many processes within the body, such as:

●       Metabolism

●       Heart rate

●       Sleep cycle

●       Reproductive cycle

●       Sexual functions

●       Growth and development

●       Stress levels

●       Mood

When we’re deficient in something when our body goes through changes (menstruation, pregnancy, and puberty), or because of environmental factors like stress, medications, or a medical condition, our whole system goes on the fritz.

Signs You Have a Vitamin or Hormone Deficiency

Your body is more in tune with itself than you may think.  It communicates when something is wrong in a variety of ways. For example, the condition of your nails, the shape of your fingers and eyebrows, hair, and thyroid can all indicate you suffer from a deficiency.

Signs you may be deficient in iron, vitamin D, vitamin B, or vitamin C include:

·         Brittle nails

·         Severe hair loss

·         Joint pain

·         Prone to cold sores

·         Irregular heartbeat

A vitamin B12 imbalance may look like this:

·         Burning sensations in the feet or tongue

·         Lower cognitive ability

·         Impaired memory

·         A decline in overall demeanor

Another way to tell is by looking at your tongue. Go on. Stick it out and look in a mirror.  If there are ridges or horizontal slits on your tongue accompanied by a white film, it could mean you have a deficiency.

In addition to these signs of a vitamin deficiency, common symptoms of a hormonal imbalance include:

●       Unexplained weight loss or gain

●       Excessive sweating

●       Difficulty sleeping

●       Dry skin

●       Weak bones

●       Mood swings

●       Anxiety or depression

●       Chronic fatigue

●       Blurred vision

●       Bloating

Could it Be Adrenal Fatigue Syndrome?

A common cause of hormonal imbalances is adrenal fatigue syndrome (AFS), which we’ve discussed at length in the past. When your hormones can no longer stand up to daily stressors, it could lead to changes that you don’t even realize are happening.

Signs of AFS include:

●       Irregular menstruation

●       Low sex drive

●       Insomnia

●       Fatigue

●       Advanced signs of aging

All the different vitamins and hormones within the body must be in balance for us to feel healthy and happy. Some are made naturally in the body, and others require external sources.

If you have noticed any of the above signs and think it may be tied to a deficiency, call 203-840-0000 for a phone consultation or to schedule an in-person appointment, and find out for sure.

Sources:

Healthline – 8 Signs and Symptoms of Vitamin D Deficiency

Rush EDU – 6 Signs of Nutrient Deficiency

Medical News Today – What to Know About Hormonal Imbalances

Headache, Depression or Anxiety? Why You Need Magnesium…

You may have heard of the mineral magnesium, but if you have headaches, depression or anxiety you really need to pay attention.

Magnesium is needed for your body to properly transmit muscle and nerve impulses and regulate proper enzyme activity. Your body also receives help from magnesium to maintain a proper pH balance. Magnesium helps you process your food and helps carbohydrates, proteins, and fat, converting them into energy. In fact, magnesium is so important it’s one of the first things medical doctors reach for when someone is in the middle of a heart attack.

If you don’t have enough magnesium, these processes don’t work properly.

What else can magnesium do for you? Well, it’s a natural sedative, so it can help with insomnia, depression, and anxiety. You can also use it for muscle spasms, and to help with intermittent claudication (which is an achy and burning sensation in the legs caused by a restriction of blood flow).

Magnesium will also deliver relief for women with PMS who experience severe symptoms. Very often women suffering from PMD (dysmenorrhea or painful periods) and infertility are deficient in magnesium. It’s so powerful, it also helps relax the constricted bronchial tubes that occur in asthma, and many have found that using Vitamin B6, magnesium and avoiding dairy and wheat has helped tremendously! In your body, magnesium helps your neurotransmitters communicate properly with each other.

What can happen when you have a deficiency?

Consider this list of symptoms: headache, fatigue, leg cramps, joint pain, IBS, insomnia, confusion, swollen gums, heart disease, even appetite loss, and the list goes on! Magnesium is a major stress-coping vitamin.

If you have a lot of calcium running around in your bloodstream, it can reduce the amount of magnesium absorbed in the body, leading to a deficiency. You can remedy this by taking the proper vitamins.

Many doctors think you can get enough magnesium from diet alone, but many of our nation’s food sources are depleted of the mineral thanks to fertilizers and processing. So if you need the extra, the best way to get it is through vitamin.

Let’s look at risk factors for magnesium deficiency.

First, are you stressed?

High amounts of stress and a diet of simple sugars can reduce magnesium; stress can be emotional, psychological, or physical. Each stressful moment you encounter, your body uses up magnesium, and then, without it, stress becomes magnified.

It’s a nasty cycle, right?

Drinking alcohol consistently can also affect your magnesium levels because alcohol increases your kidney’s excretion of magnesium. Your digestive tract is also negatively affected by alcohol, which can lead to even lower levels. Caffeine is also a culprit, it too works with your kidneys.

Take care to stay away from dark-colored carbonated beverages, such as soda, because sodas include phosphates that bind with magnesium.

If you take certain medications such as diuretics, birth control, asthma medication, estrogen replacements, these also increase magnesium excretion.

If you suffer from chronic headaches and/or migraines, we recommend you take a high dose multivitamin and 600 mg of magnesium. You can start by adding it in doses of 150 mg gradually increasing the dose until you have a loose bowel movement, then reduce the dose until your BMs are back to normal.

The best magnesium type is citrate or chelate because they won’t irritate your stomach.

It’s time to get your life back — and one step toward the road to recovery is magnesium. It’s a journey your body will thank you for!

Fear Has Two Meanings

Fear is a terrible thing. It paralyzes us. It makes us feel weak, inadequate, vulnerable and unable to fight. What if instead of pushing a fear-based agenda, the news talked about positive stories and helped raise us up.

In this note to you, I wanted to give you 10 positive things to think about regarding this virus. These truths will have a positive impact on your thought process, which will always make you stronger mentally and physically.

So here goes:

1. Wuhan, which was the epicenter of the COVID-19 epidemic, has closed the last of its 16 temporary coronavirus hospitals because there aren’t enough patients to keep them open.

2. A 103-year-old woman in Wuhan has become the oldest person to beat the novel coronavirus. She recovered only six days after being admitted to the hospital.

3. All the Apple stores in China have reopened after being closed for one month amid the height of the coronavirus outbreak in the country.

4. A group of scientists in Canada has successfully isolated and grown copies of the coronavirus responsible for the COVID-19 pandemic. Isolating the virus, researchers said, will help in developing treatment regimens

5. Scientists are finding it may be possible to use the plasma from recently recovered coronavirus patients to treat those who have become severely ill as a result of COVID-19 infections.

6. A Taylor Swift fan posted on Tumblr she wouldn’t be able to pay her rent. Soon after the post went live Ms. Swift herself sent her fan the money she needed to cover her expenses.

7. In Copenhagen, residents joined in with a workout from their balconies, maintaining social distancing between households while also keeping fit and healthy through exercise.

8. In Massachusetts, before a mandatory shut down of shops was ordered, a ‘mystery man’ bought all the flowers in one florist and distributed them to the town of Needham’s inhabitants.

9. Personal trainer and fitness influencer Joe Wicks, better known as the Body Coach, on social media is helping parents up and down the country who are homeschooling their children from today after schools were ordered to close last Friday.

From Monday to Friday at 9 am, Wicks will be streaming 30-minute long live PE classes that children can do from their homes.

10. Kylie Jenner donated $1 million to LA hospitals to help buy more protective masks and clothing for medical staff working there, according to the beauty mogul’s doctor who shared her thanks on Instagram.

11. Lastly, Vitamin C in high doses kills all viruses known to man. This virus is no exception. If you are healthy, take a minimum of 2000mg of vitamin C daily. If you are run down or sick, increase your dosage to 6000-8000mg spread throughout the day. See the press release from Shanghai below*.

Instead of letting fear run you ragged, use the knowledge you have and face it. Be confident in yourself and stop reading the strategically-placed headlines. Creating fear and panic was the plan all along. Research. Dig deep. Pause for a moment and look at the big picture. Save yourself from a lot of unnecessary stress. Rise up!

*********************************************************
*FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE*

Orthomolecular Medicine News Service, Mar 3, 2020

Shanghai Government Officially Recommends Vitamin C for COVID-19

by Andrew W. Saul (OMNS Mar 3, 2020) The government of Shanghai, China has announced its official recommendation that COVID-19 should be treated with high amounts of intravenous vitamin C. (1) Dosage recommendations vary with severity of illness, from 50 to 200 milligrams per kilogram body weight per day to as much as 200 mg/kg/day.

“Intravenous vitamin C is a safe, effective, and broad-spectrum antiviral.”

Richard Z. Cheng, MD, PhD, a Chinese-American specialist physician, has been working closely with medical and governmental authorities throughout China. He has been instrumental in facilitating at least three Chinese clinical IV vitamin C studies now underway. Dr. Cheng is presently in Shanghai continuing his efforts to encourage still more Chinese hospitals to implement vitamin C therapy incorporating high oral doses as well as C by IV.

Dr. Cheng and Dr. Yanagisawa both recommend oral vitamin C for prevention of COVID-19 infection. An official statement from Xi’an Jiaotong University Second Hospital (2) reads:

“On the afternoon of February 20, 2020, another 4 patients with severe new coronaviral pneumonia recovered from the C10 West Ward of Tongji Hospital. In the past 8 patients have been discharged from hospital. . . high-dose vitamin C achieved good results in clinical applications. We believe that for patients with severe neonatal pneumonia and critically ill patients, vitamin C treatment should be initiated as soon as possible after admission. . .early application of large doses of vitamin C can have a strong antioxidant effect, reduce inflammatory responses, and improve endothelial function. . . Numerous studies have shown that the dose of vitamin C has a lot to do with the effect of treatment. . . high-dose vitamin C can not only improve antiviral levels but more importantly, can prevent and treat acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress (ARDS).”

Based on a large meta-analysis, regular intake of vitamin C has not been shown to prevent colds but it can shorten the duration of colds (by 8 % in adults and 14 % in children) with slightly less severe symptoms. Athletes who take vitamin C regularly are half as likely to catch a cold as athletes who don’t.

A 1999 study done on 463 students showed that mega- dosing vitamin C may be helpful in treating you right after the appearance of the symptoms with hourly doses of 1000 mg of Vitamin C for the first 6 hours and then 3 times daily thereafter. Overall, it was reported that cold symptoms in the test group decreased 85 % compared with the control group after the administration of megadose Vitamin C.

In stressed mice, mega dosing vitamin C helped to prevent from influenza and (H1N1)-induced pneumonia.

A recent 2020 meta-analysis published on the Journal of Intensive Care showed that 1–6 g of intravenous vitamin C per day shortened the ventilation time on patients needing intensive care on average by 25 %.