Visit our Location
205 Main Avenue Norwalk, CT 06851
Give us a Call
(203) 840-0000
Send us a Message
frontdesk@drslovin.com
Opening Hours
Mon – Fri: 9AM-1PM & 3PM-6PM
Saturday: By Appointment Only

“The Silent Epidemic”

People all over the world have spent months indoors, and the more time you spend inside, the likelihood of obtaining a healthy amount of sunlight exposure, and the vitamin produced as a result — vitamin D3 — continues to decline.

Why does this matter? [Watch video HERE]

Vitamin D deficiency has been called a, “The Silent Epidemic,” and some experts estimate that as high as 90% of Americans – or 9 in 10 – suffer from it.

Vitamin D functions more like a hormone than a vitamin, with extremely minute doses being essential for the regulation of most of the genes in the human body as well as innumerable cellular pathways and processes. Perhaps the most well-known function of vitamin D’s role in the modulation and regulation of the human immune system. There’s compelling evidence to suggest optimizing your vitamin D level can reduce your risk of COVID-19 and other viral infections such as seasonal influenza. A number of different scientists are calling for people and governments to prepare for the second wave of COVID-19 come fall, both in the U.S. and abroad. Considering SARS-CoV-2 has been shown to be responsive to temperature and humidity, with infectiousness increasing with lower temperatures and humidity levels, we’re likely going to see a reemergence of COVID-19 infections in the fall, during normal influenza season.

Which brings me to my point.

Right now, what’s REALLY IMPORTANT: Optimize Your Vitamin D Level Before Fall!

What this means is you now have a known “deadline” for optimizing your vitamin D level. To improve your immune function and lower your risk of viral infections, you’ll want to raise your vitamin D to a level between 60 nanograms per milliliter (ng/mL) and 80 ng/mL by fall.

Historically, December typically has the highest flu activity in the U.S., but it would probably be good to aim for October, or maybe even earlier depending on your location. Optimizing your vitamin D is particularly important if you have darker skin, as darker skin places you at higher risk for vitamin D deficiency — and serious COVID-19 infection. As reported by The Guardian, the COVID-19 mortality among black Americans is three times higher than that of whites, and researchers have long known that blacks cannot achieve optimal vitamin D levels from sun exposure at any time of the year in Northern America.

So, how do you go about optimizing your vitamin D level?

First, you need to find out what your base level is, this is done using a simple blood test.  Once you know what your blood level is, you can assess the dose needed to maintain or improve your level. Again, the ideal level you’re looking for is above 40 ng/mL, and ideally between 60 ng/mL and 80 ng/mL  The easiest way to raise your level is by getting regular, safe sun exposure, but if you’re very dark-skinned, you may need to spend about 1.5 hours a day in the sun to have any noticeable effect. Those with very light skin may only need 15 minutes a day, which is far easier to achieve. Still, even with light skill people will typically struggle to maintain ideal levels during the winter. So, depending on your situation, you may need to use an oral vitamin D3 supplement. How much do you need? On average, people should take approximately 27 IU of D per pound of body weight. For example, if you weigh 100 lbs, you should take 2700IU of D daily. If the average male weighs 170 lbs, you should be taking approximately 4500IU of D, depending upon your skin color and your base dose of course.

I urge everyone to share this information with friends, family, and community at large so that we can minimize a second outbreak. The media is already telling us we are going to have another outbreak. They are going to make sure it happens.

Optimizing your vitamin D could help save many lives; far more than any vaccine program ever could.

How to Know if You’re Deficient in Vitamins and Hormones

How to Know if You’re Deficient in Vitamins and Hormones

There are many reasons imbalances occur within the body, and each body reacts differently to these disparities. The better you understand your system, the more prepared you’ll be to face some of the most common side effects, like migraine, head-on (pun totally intended).

It’s human nature to assume if we eat a healthy diet, we’re getting all the nutrients, vitamins, and minerals we need; however, this isn’t always the case. Many people suffer from vitamin and hormone deficiencies without even knowing it.

Today, I’m going to look at a few telltale signs of these deficiencies.  Let’s see if it helps you narrow down some of your issues.  First, let’s review the role and importance of the essentials.

Why Are Hormones and Vitamins Important?

Vitamins and minerals play an instrumental role in how we heal, turn food into energy, keep illnesses at bay, and repair any cellular damage.

Hormones, on the other hand, help regulate many processes within the body, such as:

●       Metabolism

●       Heart rate

●       Sleep cycle

●       Reproductive cycle

●       Sexual functions

●       Growth and development

●       Stress levels

●       Mood

When we’re deficient in something when our body goes through changes (menstruation, pregnancy, and puberty), or because of environmental factors like stress, medications, or a medical condition, our whole system goes on the fritz.

Signs You Have a Vitamin or Hormone Deficiency

Your body is more in tune with itself than you may think.  It communicates when something is wrong in a variety of ways. For example, the condition of your nails, the shape of your fingers and eyebrows, hair, and thyroid can all indicate you suffer from a deficiency.

Signs you may be deficient in iron, vitamin D, vitamin B, or vitamin C include:

·         Brittle nails

·         Severe hair loss

·         Joint pain

·         Prone to cold sores

·         Irregular heartbeat

A vitamin B12 imbalance may look like this:

·         Burning sensations in the feet or tongue

·         Lower cognitive ability

·         Impaired memory

·         A decline in overall demeanor

Another way to tell is by looking at your tongue. Go on. Stick it out and look in a mirror.  If there are ridges or horizontal slits on your tongue accompanied by a white film, it could mean you have a deficiency.

In addition to these signs of a vitamin deficiency, common symptoms of a hormonal imbalance include:

●       Unexplained weight loss or gain

●       Excessive sweating

●       Difficulty sleeping

●       Dry skin

●       Weak bones

●       Mood swings

●       Anxiety or depression

●       Chronic fatigue

●       Blurred vision

●       Bloating

Could it Be Adrenal Fatigue Syndrome?

A common cause of hormonal imbalances is adrenal fatigue syndrome (AFS), which we’ve discussed at length in the past. When your hormones can no longer stand up to daily stressors, it could lead to changes that you don’t even realize are happening.

Signs of AFS include:

●       Irregular menstruation

●       Low sex drive

●       Insomnia

●       Fatigue

●       Advanced signs of aging

All the different vitamins and hormones within the body must be in balance for us to feel healthy and happy. Some are made naturally in the body, and others require external sources.

If you have noticed any of the above signs and think it may be tied to a deficiency, call 203-840-0000 for a phone consultation or to schedule an in-person appointment, and find out for sure.

Sources:

Healthline – 8 Signs and Symptoms of Vitamin D Deficiency

Rush EDU – 6 Signs of Nutrient Deficiency

Medical News Today – What to Know About Hormonal Imbalances