Visit Us
205 Main Avenue Norwalk, CT 06851
Give us a Call
(203) 840-0000
Send us a Message
frontdesk@drslovin.com
Opening Hours
Mon – Fri: 9AM-6PM

Stress Causing Pain? 3 Things Your Doctor CAN’T Do


Stress makes everything—especially pain—worse. Unfortunately, medical science and a doctor’s skill can only take you so far. We can show you the water, but it’s up to you to drink.

How Stress Impacts Health

Stress increases brain activity, making your nervous system more sensitive, and tightens the brain’s blood vessels. It’s often a subtle culprit to chronic pain, but it’s manageable when you’re aware of your stressors.

Chronic stress—physical, mental, or emotional—forces the body into survival mode. Your adrenal glands atop each kidney constantly release stress hormones, which inhibit the gland’s proper functioning. That affects other glands and organs as well.

Anything that runs at full speed for long periods is bound to overheat and eventually break down; your body’s stress response is no different. Even the most minor problems—like a traffic jam or a bad day at work—can affect your physical and mental health. Consistently high levels of big and small stressors lead to:

  • An overworked endocrine system that can’t keep up with high-stress demands
  • Too much effort required of the heart
  • Cravings for unhealthy and damaging foods
  • Higher risk of prediabetes, diabetes, and metabolic syndrome
  • Muscle tension, headaches, and back pain
  • Menstrual irregularities (or your period stops completely)
  • An overwhelmed immune system
  • Increased risk for chronic stomach pains and inflammatory bowel disease
  • Memory loss and cognitive decline

Stress is common in this chaos-driven world. It’s essential to learn ways of coping with stressors, primarily if it’s affecting your health and quality of life. Pain lowers your tolerance and kicks you in the teeth if left unaddressed.

I know it’s tough to change behaviors and find new coping mechanisms, but you don’t have to do it alone. Your doctor can help you find practices that work with your schedule, preferences, goals, and personal situation; however, there are a few things doctors can’t do for you when it comes to treating stress-induced pain.

We Can’t Do the Hardest Work

The hardest part of relieving stress-caused pain is what you do at home and in the privacy of your thoughts. That doesn’t mean your doctor can’t help you discover new coping mechanisms and support to reach your goals. It means we can’t change the way you think about and deal with your troubled teen, wandering spouse, or terrible boss. As a chiropractor, I can help relieve some of the tension in your spine, giving your internal body a fighting chance to regulate stress’s chemical and hormonal response. I’m able to provide you with a wealth of information about coping techniques, and I have dozens of resources at your disposal. The rest is up to you

We Can’t Make Promises About a Cure

Doctors aren’t in the habit of making promises, especially in medical treatments. I can’t and won’t promise spinal manipulation will relieve your neck pain. It probably will if you follow treatment protocols, but that’s not a promise I can keep. As your chiropractor, I can only promise to provide you with all the necessary tools to improve your health and quality of life.

We Can’t Make it Stop Without Time

As much as we wish it were different, doctors know there’s no magic touch or cure-all pill. There’s no one-size-fits-all solution for stress-induced pain because, like everything else about you, each case is unique. We’re doctors, but we’re also whole humans bound by Time. Good health doesn’t happen overnight. With patience, perseverance, and commitment, a good doctor can help you through the long-haul journey.

If you’d like to learn more about how we treat chronic pain at Slovin Chiropractic Center, let’s have a chat! Our doctors stand ready to help you take the next step to a healthier life.

Request an Appointment

Resources:

Healthline: The Effects of Stress on Your Body

Cleveland Clinic Health Essentials: 7 Strange Things Stress Can Do to Your Body

EXCLI Journal: Experimental and Clinical Sciences: The Impact of Stress on Body Function: A Review

Get Off Your Butt!

Get Off Your Butt!

Think about it. You sit for everything:
• Driving
• Working
• Eating
• Watching a movie
• Waiting for appointments
• Going to the bathroom

Sitting is the new addiction.

Choosing to be more active sounds simple, but that doesn’t translate to easy.

Science Daily News published a study from University College London in early 2020, which reported,

“Too much time sitting still is linked to an increased risk of depressive symptoms in adolescents.”

As a chiropractor, I deal with a lot of sitting-related issues.

Here are a few ideas of how you can help yourself:

• Take the stairs
• Park in the back of the lot
• Walk the long way to your mailbox
• Ride a bike to work
• Take a walk at lunch
• A two-minute break every half hour for stretching

Symptoms of sitting too long include:

• Back pain and sciatica
• Neck pain
• Obesity
• Heart disease
• Type 2 diabetes
• Clots or DVT (deep venous thrombosis)
• Dementia and Alzheimer’s disease

Ergonomic chairs and furniture may not be something you can implement right away, That’s okay!

Here are a few good posture tips:

• Sit up straight and support your back with a pillow
• At your desk, make sure your elbows are at 90-degree angles.

• When standing or sitting, keep your neck and shoulders straight.
• Avoid looking down at screens. Hold them up!

• When sitting, rest your feet on the floor so your knees are at least 90 degrees.

• At your desk, keep your mouse close so you don’t have to extend your elbow.
• Roll your shoulders and neck frequently.

• Move often, sitting no more than an hour at a time.

These tips can help, and if you need more help, give me a call. We can chat and get you some more answers. Until then!

“The Silent Epidemic”

People all over the world have spent months indoors, and the more time you spend inside, the likelihood of obtaining a healthy amount of sunlight exposure, and the vitamin produced as a result — vitamin D3 — continues to decline.

Why does this matter? [Watch video HERE]

Vitamin D deficiency has been called a, “The Silent Epidemic,” and some experts estimate that as high as 90% of Americans – or 9 in 10 – suffer from it.

Vitamin D functions more like a hormone than a vitamin, with extremely minute doses being essential for the regulation of most of the genes in the human body as well as innumerable cellular pathways and processes. Perhaps the most well-known function of vitamin D’s role in the modulation and regulation of the human immune system. There’s compelling evidence to suggest optimizing your vitamin D level can reduce your risk of COVID-19 and other viral infections such as seasonal influenza. A number of different scientists are calling for people and governments to prepare for the second wave of COVID-19 come fall, both in the U.S. and abroad. Considering SARS-CoV-2 has been shown to be responsive to temperature and humidity, with infectiousness increasing with lower temperatures and humidity levels, we’re likely going to see a reemergence of COVID-19 infections in the fall, during normal influenza season.

Which brings me to my point.

Right now, what’s REALLY IMPORTANT: Optimize Your Vitamin D Level Before Fall!

What this means is you now have a known “deadline” for optimizing your vitamin D level. To improve your immune function and lower your risk of viral infections, you’ll want to raise your vitamin D to a level between 60 nanograms per milliliter (ng/mL) and 80 ng/mL by fall.

Historically, December typically has the highest flu activity in the U.S., but it would probably be good to aim for October, or maybe even earlier depending on your location. Optimizing your vitamin D is particularly important if you have darker skin, as darker skin places you at higher risk for vitamin D deficiency — and serious COVID-19 infection. As reported by The Guardian, the COVID-19 mortality among black Americans is three times higher than that of whites, and researchers have long known that blacks cannot achieve optimal vitamin D levels from sun exposure at any time of the year in Northern America.

So, how do you go about optimizing your vitamin D level?

First, you need to find out what your base level is, this is done using a simple blood test.  Once you know what your blood level is, you can assess the dose needed to maintain or improve your level. Again, the ideal level you’re looking for is above 40 ng/mL, and ideally between 60 ng/mL and 80 ng/mL  The easiest way to raise your level is by getting regular, safe sun exposure, but if you’re very dark-skinned, you may need to spend about 1.5 hours a day in the sun to have any noticeable effect. Those with very light skin may only need 15 minutes a day, which is far easier to achieve. Still, even with light skill people will typically struggle to maintain ideal levels during the winter. So, depending on your situation, you may need to use an oral vitamin D3 supplement. How much do you need? On average, people should take approximately 27 IU of D per pound of body weight. For example, if you weigh 100 lbs, you should take 2700IU of D daily. If the average male weighs 170 lbs, you should be taking approximately 4500IU of D, depending upon your skin color and your base dose of course.

I urge everyone to share this information with friends, family, and community at large so that we can minimize a second outbreak. The media is already telling us we are going to have another outbreak. They are going to make sure it happens.

Optimizing your vitamin D could help save many lives; far more than any vaccine program ever could.